14: Mixing and Tracking Electric Guitars – Research (Adding Interest)

There is a LOT of advice regarding guitar mixing, which is rather overwhelming. I tried to allow my interest to lead me during this research, with the material that challenged my usual workflow being the material I shall present here.
Firstly, this episode of “Into the Lair” is has some good methods for adding width to electric guitars:

http://www.pensadosplace.tv/2013/09/30/how-to-mix-rock-guitars-and-get-them-wide-into-the-lair-86/

In particular, his use of pitch shifting and doubling are things that I shall keep in mind for future mixes.

Unusually for SOS, this article has quite a lot of obvious tips, but there is one thing in particular that I found useful:

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/aug98/articles/20tips.html

It gives a tip about using DI electric guitar signals, and compressing and using an exciter to attain a “glassy” clean sound.
I feel that even if this didn’t do the trick on its own that layering this over a desirable amped tone would give some beneficial high end “sparkle” to the sound. This is again, something I shall keep in mind.

http://soundpropaganda.com/2011/08/12/recording-and-mixing-rock-guitars/

The article linked above is similar to the SOS article, as it has a LOT of advice which, to me, is rather obvious at this stage. One piece of advice it gives is interesting though; Parallel compression of guitars. Although I use parallel compression quite frequently, I would never think to use it to “fatten” guitars, but it makes a lot of sense to do so. I think that I will have to change the way I think of parallel compression in general to allow me to utilize it more effectively and frequently.

http://www.osirisguitar.com/10-tips-for-great-guitar-mixing/

The above link is a short blog, but has one tip that I’d like to test out. It calls the area around 800Hz the “cheap” spot, saying that this area makes guitars sound “cheap”. I’m intrigued by this idea, and shall listen closely to this when I can. Perhaps cutting this frequency band could help solidify my guitar recordings? (can’t hurt to try). It seems a little “gimmicky” and too easy, but I’m open to trying the idea.

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